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Friday, May 1, 2020 | History

7 edition of Salt glands in birds and reptiles found in the catalog.

Salt glands in birds and reptiles

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Published by Cambridge University Press in Cambridge [Eng.], New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Salt gland

  • Edition Notes

    StatementM. Peaker and J. L. Linzell.
    SeriesMonographs of the Physiological Society ; no. 32, Monographs of the Physiological Society ;, no. 32.
    ContributionsLinzell, J. L., joint author.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQP188.S26 P4
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxi, 307 p., [8] leaves of plates :
    Number of Pages307
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5243272M
    ISBN 100521206294
    LC Control Number75314900


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Salt glands in birds and reptiles by Malcolm Peaker Download PDF EPUB FB2

Salt Glands in Birds and Reptiles (Monographs of the Physiological Society) 1st Edition by M Peaker (Author) out of 5 stars 2 ratings. ISBN ISBN Why is ISBN important.

ISBN. This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. Cited by: Salt Glands in Birds and Reptiles. Monograph. Series: their role in non-marine birds and reptiles and their evolution.

Salt glands have interested biologists from a wide range of disciplines. This book brings together the scattered literature and will be a convenient source of reference to those working in the field, as well as providing.

In addition to the basic physiology of salt glands there is consideration of their ecological importance, their interaction with other systems of the body, their role in non-marine birds and reptiles and their evolution.

Salt glands have interested biologists from a wide Salt glands in birds and reptiles book of disciplines. This book brings together the scattered literature 5/5(1). BRAD A. LOCK, in Reptile Medicine and Surgery (Second Edition), Salt Glands. Accessory salt glands are present in all orders of reptiles including many commonly kept as pets such as Green Iguanas (Iguana iguana) and Uromastix sp.

These glands function to rid the animals of excess salts accumulated, during feeding in the Marine Iguanas (Amblyrhynchus sp.), as a result of the environment. Buy a cheap copy of Salt Glands in Birds and Reptiles book by Malcolm Peaker.

The aim of the authors in writing this monograph has been to provide a comprehensive and critical, but personal account of salt glands. Salt glands in birds and reptiles book Papers on salt glands are Free shipping over $ Salt Glands in Birds and Reptiles by Malcolm Peaker,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.

Salt Glands in Birds and Reptiles: Malcolm Peaker: We use cookies to give you the best possible experience. Buy Salt Glands in Birds and Reptiles (Monographs of the Physiological Society) 1 by Peaker, M (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low /5(2). The role of salt glands in avian osmoregulation has been widely studied. Acclimation to saline habitats in aquatic birds involves increases in the relative size and complexity of the salt glands.

There are five different kinds of head glands in reptiles that have become modified into salt glands: (1) lachrymal, (2) lingual, (3) nasal, (4) posterior sublingual, and (5) Salt glands in birds and reptiles book. All reptilian salt glands have one feature in common, that is, the presence of a major cell type, the principal by: 2.

Salt glands in birds and reptiles by Peaker, Malcolm. Publication date Topics Salt Salt glands in birds and reptiles book Publisher Cambridge [Eng.] ; New York: Cambridge University Press Borrow this book to access EPUB and PDF files.

IN COLLECTIONS. Books to Borrow. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Trent University Library : COVID Resources.

Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library Salt glands in birds and reptiles book as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

In addition to the basic physiology of salt glands there is consideration of their ecological importance, their interaction with other systems of the body, their role in non-marine birds and reptiles and their evolution.

Salt glands have interested biologists from a wide range of disciplines. This book brings together the scattered literature. : Salt Glands In Birds And Reptiles: pages. Ex-University Library. Book and Jacket are both in Very good condition throughout.

The only exception is Salt glands in birds and reptiles book small inscription to the inside page. The Aim Of Thei Mongraph Has Been To Provide A Comprehensive And Critical, But Personal Account Of Salt Glands.

Salt Glands in Birds and Reptiles (Physiological Social Monograph) by Peaker, M. & Linzell, J.L. and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at The aim of the authors in writing this monograph has been to provide a comprehensive and critical, but personal account of salt glands.

Papers on salt glands are scattered through a great many different journals. There is therefore a great need for a synthesis of what is known about salt Price: $ The gross histology and ultrastructural morphology of the lachrymal salt gland in chelonians has been studied in most Early studies suggested that the salt glands of both birds and reptiles.

In other cases, specialized cells are assembled into organs of salt uptake or salt elimination; e.g., the salt glands of birds (see below Vertebrate excretory systems: Birds and reptiles).

This dispersal of the regulatory function may be the primitive condition, for it is only in the more highly evolved terrestrial animals that the regulatory. The secretory mechanism; 7. Factors affecting the concentration of nasal fluid; 8.

Hormones and salt-gland secretion; 9. Adaptation of the gland; Integration between the salt gland and other organs; Comparative and applied physiology; Part II.

Reptilian Salt Glands: Marine reptiles; Terrestrial reptiles; Evolution of salt. Salt Glands in Birds and Reptiles. Great Britain: Cambridge University Press, - This book is a very comprehensive review of over (I stopped counting past when I got to H in the list of authors of papers referenced) scientific studies of the research on the nasal salt glands of birds and reptiles by myriad authors.

Similar glands are found in marine reptiles, but since the anatomical origin is orbital in some reptiles while it is nasal in birds, we have found it desirable to stress the functional similarity of these glands by the use of terms such as “salt secreting glands”, or for simplicity, “salt glands”.Cited by: Birds are a group of feathered theropod dinosaurs, and constitute the only living se, birds are considered reptiles in the modern cladistic sense of the term, and their closest living relatives are the are descendants of the primitive avialans (whose members include Archaeopteryx) which first appeared about million years ago (mya) in : Ornithurae.

Looking for a book by J. Linzell. Linzell wrote Salt Glands in Birds and Reptiles (Physiological Social Monograph) (Physiological Social Monograph), which can be purchased at a lower price at A number of excellent reviews of various aspects of osmoregulation in reptiles have been published recently (BRADSHAW, ; BENTLEY, ; DANTZLER, ; Cited by: 2.

Reptiles are tetrapod animals in the class Reptilia, comprising today's turtles, crocodilians, snakes, amphisbaenians, lizards, tuatara, and their extinct study of these traditional reptile orders, historically combined with that of modern amphibians, is called herpetology.

Because some reptiles are more closely related to birds than they are to other reptiles (e.g., crocodiles Clade: Sauropsida.

Reptiles DK Publishing. This is a horrifying book about lizards (just look at the cover if you doubt me). It is definitely not suitable for children under the age of 12, unless you want to scare the crap out of the child.

birds shells africa south america. The marine environment is home to a variety of birds and reptiles. At first glance, reptiles and birds may appear to be very different from The presence of salt glands in Marine Reptiles and Birds Sea snake Figure The yellow-bellied sea snake, a ven- In his book The Voyage of the Beagle, Charles Darwin described this marine.

Most birds are able to travel long distances to obtain drinking water, although some can also survive without access to free water. Excess ions are lost by many reptiles and birds via cranial salt glands. Mammals do not have salt glands, and remove excess ions by producing urine that is hyperosmotic to Evaporative resistance (s cm–1).

The salt glands (also called nasal gland or supraorbital glands) are not part of the skull, but their location is visible on the outer surface of the skull, just above the eye. Jaw hinge and palate. For more on these features, see Skulls: reptiles vs. mammals on this Bio 6A site.

In addition to birds, marine turtles (both plant-eating and carnivorous), sea snakes, and marine lizards (i.e., the Galapagos iguana) also possess salt glands which process seawater in a manner similar to seabird salt glands.

12 Some evolutionists believe that avian salt glands "have been inherited from the birds' reptilian ancestors". Beaks of birds often reveal their food habits. Birds eat a tremendous amount per body mass - to fuel their high metabolic rate.

A hummingbird eats % of its body weight each day, a blue tit about 30% and a chicken, %. Food enters the mouth and is lubricated by salivary glands.

Food travels mouth (pharynx) → muscular esophagus → stomach. The opportunity to prepare a second edition of a book that was originally written 30 years ago has provided me with both a challenge and a source of pleas over ure; the former as it needed to be spatially constrained within its original limits.

Nevertheless, over references have been added. I must apologize to the many biologists whose contributions could not be included.4/5(1). THE SALT-SECRETING GLAND OF MARINE BIRDS usual interpretation has been that the fune- the salt gland in living marine birds, its pres-tion of the gland should be to rinse away the ence in fossil forms can safely be taken as anirritating and harmful effects of sea water indication of a marine habitat.

The "salt" glands of these terrestrial birds and reptiles, unlike those found in marine birds and reptiles, are used primarily to excrete potassium. "In other words the secretion resembles that of the ostrich and differs markedly in composition from that of marine birds and reptiles" (Peaker and Linzell ).

Salt glands, or the potassium-secreting glands of terrestrial (desert-dwelling) birds and reptiles, always have the characterisitc that they can secrete a. And so I looked into it and it turns out that all marine birds (and some other animals, too) have SALT GLANDS!!.

They also have kidneys but the salt glands pick up the slack for all that extra sodium by detecting osmotic shifts in the blood and concentrating salt and excreting it.

from All About Birds. Interestingly, birds have a portal renal. These salt glands are why many people who observe sea turtles on land believe that the animals are crying. The leatherback sea turtle has extremely large salt glands compared to other species; their glands are more than twice the size of their brains.

They require such. Salt glands: Another harsh environmental factor that birds must contend with are those of the saltwater environment. Saltwater birds actually have salt glands located close to their eyes that allow them to excrete salt. Actual secretion occurs through what looks like tears, but in reality is a salty drop of water.

Feeding Adaptations. Start studying Marine Science chapter 13 Quiz. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. salt glands. organ in marine birds and reptiles that removed excess salt. sea snake. paddle shaped tail, highly venemous, non aggressive.

Many organisms living in the oceans or in salt lakes are hyporegulators, meaning that they maintain their body fluids hypo-osmotically to the external medium. Marine fish hyporegulate by drinking the external medium and transporting sodium and chloride ions outward across the gills.

Marine reptiles and birds use salt glands in the head to transport hyperosmotic fluids outward. There are two basic solutions to this problem. Turtles and birds have special salt glands (concentrations of chloride cells) near their eyes which actively pump Cl-ions out of the body; Na + ions follow.

Thus, birds and turtles can drink seawater and pump the excess ions out of their bodies, retaining the water.

vi. PREFACE. In presenting to the public this English version of Louis Figuier's pdf work on Reptiles and Birds, I pdf to state that where alterations and additions have been made, my object has been that the style and matter should be suited to the present state of general knowledge, and that all classes should be able to obtain useful information and amusement from the pages which I.The American crocodile is distinguished by its narrow, V-shaped snout and distinctive underbite.

It also has specialized salt glands on its tongue to excrete excess salt from its brackish environment. The American crocodile is nocturnal and feeds primarily at night on a .